Sunday, March 22, 2015

Family History




Family History


The trunk of this family is lost to history
Photo fragments remain as shadows
Among anecdotal remembrances

Grandmother asphyxiated from appearances
Eldest aunt expired of embarrassment
While the youngest aunt died of denial

Uncle wallows in what could’ve been
Father perches atop it’s not my place
Above their ancestors’ termite rot

Their children and their children’s children—
Twisted branches spread far and wide—
Brethren brittle breaking, sisters snatching sky—







62 comments:

  1. That tree is perfect to be described as such! Memories...

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    1. Bekkie, the tree seems rich with history and secrets.

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  2. You never cease to amaze me. You are such a talented writer.

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  3. This is just so good, T. I am writing about BIL based on your trunk picture.

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    1. Robyn, I'm glad you have poetry as an outlet for your grief.

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  4. Just awesome. I really like the second verse. :)

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    1. Thanks, Sheri. I struggled with the second verse because I really wanted to say that the grandmother asphyxiated from keeping up with appearances, but then it would throw the poem off. I hope it was implied.

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  5. That really has a keen sense of humor to it.

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    1. Thank you, Alex. The Irish have a dark humor. That's where I was going with it.

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  6. Hi Theresa .. and as Spring approaches more littlies appear ... love your thoughts here ... so true for many families I think ... I know it would be for ours .. cheers Hilary

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    1. Hilary, that stiff-upper-lip and worried-about-offending definitely has a British feel, doesn't it? Cheers!

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  7. Awesome. I really like the third paragraph. Robin is right. You're really talented.

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  8. I like that tree, and I like your poem too! I especially like the line about how the aunt died of denial. I know of people who spend their lives denying what's right in front of them because they can't handle the truth; it's sad.

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    1. Neurotic Workaholic, it is sad. That denial often leads to destructive behavior.

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  9. Clever interpretation of the prompt! I like the bit of wry humor in this.

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    1. Thank you, Rommy. I'm glad you saw what I was going for.

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  10. I loved this...the aunts denial a high point!!

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    1. Thank you, Kay! Those two middle stanzas were fun to write.

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  11. What a beautiful tree! It does lend itself to some interesting family stories I am sure. :) A tree holding secrets and mysteries (and lots of other stuff it sounds like). Awesome poem!
    ~Jess

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  12. Even lacking perfection the children will still be closest to the sky in a family tree...

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  13. Great alliteration, Theresa. Love the photo and the poem. Thanks for sharing.

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  14. Amazing imagery, and I love the photo and green font.

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  15. I like the spread of this family tree. A story with every branch!.

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    1. I like the idea of a story with every branch, Helena.

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  16. That pic makes a great match to the words. Gorgeous.

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  17. Yeah death surely is a feature of life dear Theresa , an integral component of the Feng Shui , some might say , cheers

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    1. Tess, sadly it probably describes many families.

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  19. I really enjoyed your take on this picture prompt .. very fitting!

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  20. The scene-setting you do in this poem recalls 1930's for me. An old musty attic with light streaming in through a window, looking at photographs found after being lost for decades.

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    1. Michael, I like that scene-setting you did, which actually isn't far off from my picture. I was actually thinking of this little space my grandmother had in her old house with photos that went back to soldier who fought for the North during the Civil War. She didn't know who those ancestors were, but they were a part of our history.

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  21. You're a talented writer, Theresa, and that beautiful tree photo makes a wonderful pairing with your thought-provoking poem.

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    1. Thank you so much, Dawn. It certainly was an inspirational photo for me. I'd been kicking the idea around for a few weeks, but this tree got me to write it.

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  22. Gorgeous photo and gorgeous writing! Love the images this evoked for me :)

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  23. This is fantastic! I really enjoyed how you weaved together such a beautiful poem with your alliteration and imagery.

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    1. Thank you so much, Jamie! I appreciate the thoughtful comment.

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  24. Are you saving all of your poems and making a collection? You really should be you are good! Very good!

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    1. That's so nice of you to say, Sharon. Yes, I save my poems. I don't know about a collection....

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  25. I always love your poetry so much, Theresa! It takes me places.

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    1. Thank you, Julie. Hope you enjoy the trip.

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  26. Wonderful poem to go with the unique picture. Well done, Theresa!

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  27. This sounds like it could be a metaphor for the many monsters lurking deep in some Southern families' closets. I need to explore your blog more and figure out if you have any short stories in you! Just the hints presented here were intriguing.

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    1. Searching for the Story (Ethan), yes, I have a few short stories here and a few others published. Thank you for the compliment.

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